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Hi there, friend!

Welcome to my little corner of the world. I talk health, fitness and lifestyle—plus any adventures that pop up along the way. Hope you have a nice stay!

flour power.

flour power.

Ah, the struggle is real. I’m not kidding. I ruined some perfectly delicious muffins because I didn’t know that coconut flour can’t be substituted directly (part for part) for regular all-purpose flour. Apparently, you need like six eggs per cup or something ridiculous to even keep that flour together. Ugh. Muffins = ruined. Though my husband was sweet enough to say they were delicious crumbled over ice cream.

I love to bake, but I've been using different flours lately. It’s not that either of us have an intolerance to wheat or gluten, I’ve just been wanting to try something new––I also LOVE the taste of almond flour, thanks to my mother-in-law’s to-die-for almond cookies. Now my fridge is stocked with hazelnut, almond, and coconut flour along with arrowroot powder and flax meal.

The whole muffin mishap happened when I asked John (the husband) which flour he might like the most. I had made a yummy vegan bread the week before with a combo of flours, and he loved it so he was into my new flour obsession, too. I felt my luck was pretty strong at this point, so why not pick a yummy recipe and just sub in the flour of my choice? Seemed logical enough, but you already know the unfortunate ending to that tale.

That’s not happening again. Hence, a cheat sheet for flour swaps:

-Coconut flour: Substitute ¼ cup to ⅓ cup for 1 cup all-purpose flour. For every 1 cup of coconut flour, you need six beaten eggs and one cup of liquid (like milk).

-Blanched almond flour: Several websites suggest you can get away with a 1:1 conversion rate, but the website I linked recommends using twice as much almond flour as all-purpose flour since the nut flour contains more moisture. Or, you can add flax seeds or chia seeds to balance out that moisture.

-Hazelnut meal: The consensus seems to be that hazelnut flour should only replace up to ⅓ of the flour in a recipe. I would suggest looking up an exact recipe to follow for this one (and probably the coconut flour). Hazelnut pancakes are right here.

Overall, using other flours isn’t as simple as I thought, but you can bake some extra delicious cookies, cakes, muffins and breads with them. If nothing else, this post should at least give you the heads up I needed before attempting crazy flour substitutions.

If you’re looking to make healthy swaps for other ingredients, here’s a good place to start. And these recipes use alternate flours already, so no swaps needed.

 

do nothing sometime.

do nothing sometime.

yoga shmoga. (and why you should do it.)

yoga shmoga. (and why you should do it.)